#SoTLAdvent: Day 06

  1. An all-encompassing lecturer
  2. Comparison of behaviour and attitudes towards plagiarism between undergraduate and post-graduate taught level in MVLS at the University of Glasgow

We are particularly delighted today to share two student contributions. The first from a graduate student at the School of Mathematics and Statistics, and the second from one of our own MEd in Academic Practice students, in collaboration with their supervisors. We hope you enjoy their work and think their findings as interesting as we did!

An all-encompassing lecturer

By Colette Mair, School of Mathematics and Statistics, on behalf of the work of Alice Parodi, graduate of the University of Glasgow.

Learning and teaching are complicated processes.  Teaching excellence may not have a universal definition and there is no rule book or user manual that lecturers can follow. 

During the 2021/22 academic session, a level 4 undergraduate honours project student aimed to understand the perception of teaching excellence through the lens of level 4 undergraduate statistics students following a survey developed by Julia Matyjasiak and Alfred Thumser “What Teaching Excellence Means to Undergraduate Students on a STEM Programme” (Matyjasiak and Thumser, 2021).  The survey contained three main sections, each with several Likert scale questions, which aimed to understand the student perception of teaching excellence, the student experience, and what makes an excellent lecture and three open questions; “Personally, how do you define teaching excellence?”, “Has COVID-19 changed your idea of teaching excellence?”, and “Do you have any further comments or thoughts on teaching excellence and your student experience at the University of Glasgow?”. The survey obtained a 55% response rate, and I will summarise the main findings in this post.

Keep reading …

Photo by Kristina Paukshtite on Pexels.com

Comparison of behaviour and attitudes towards plagiarism between undergraduate and post-graduate taught level in MVLS at the University of Glasgow

By Carolyn Loveridge and Kimberly Davis

In this blog post, I would like to talk about and share some interesting results which are part of my ongoing MEd Academic Practice Project which is under the supervision of Kimberly Davis. I will give an overview of the background and rationale behind the project, the aim and research questions, the methods which were employed, key results so far, and finish with some conclusions and key lessons learned for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) studies.

Keep reading …

Photo by Nick Collins on Pexels.com

Song of the Day

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